SOUNDWORKS

 

sound design

audio production

composition

SOUNDWORKS

sound design
audio production
& composition

Five Augmented Locations

A collection of five pieces which were not originally planned as an album - and so this is more of a retrospective hoard.

All are based on field recordings, sometimes using binaural or contact microphones, occasionally direct to an iPad and processed on the spot, as well as captured by more traditional means.

The extent of the augmentation varies. On some pieces the location work has been contorted beyond recognition with source material cut up and callously fed through a sampler. Other pieces have been affected in a more subtle manner and the sense of place remains to the fore.

With each production my intention was to work quickly. Overdubs were played live and given only one chance otherwise rejected and nothing was sequenced. Some enhancements were made directly to the recording on location.

Having said that though, each track on this collection has been especially remastered. They have all been floating around on Soundcloud this year, and a couple were included on recent Classwar Karaoke compliations - however you will find differences, especially the alternative take of Improvisation VII.

Composed and produced by Mark Tamea 2014 except (3) produced by Tamea / McNaughton 2014.

Five Augmented Locations

A collection of five pieces which were not originally planned as an album - and so this is more of a retrospective hoard.

All are based on field recordings, sometimes using binaural or contact microphones, occasionally direct to an iPad and processed on the spot, as well as captured by more traditional means.

The extent of the augmentation varies. On some pieces the location work has been contorted beyond recognition with source material cut up and callously fed through a sampler. Other pieces have been affected in a more subtle manner and the sense of place remains to the fore.

With each production my intention was to work quickly. Overdubs were played live and given only one chance otherwise rejected and nothing was sequenced. Some enhancements were made directly to the recording on location.

Having said that though, each track on this collection has been especially remastered. They have all been floating around on Soundcloud this year, and a couple were included on recent Classwar Karaoke compliations - however you will find differences, especially the alternative take of Improvisation VII.

Composed and produced by Mark Tamea 2014 except (3) produced by Tamea / McNaughton 2014.

Atomism

"See you. Me back. Begin again. That's one unique point in the hologram." - Kakkab Nammax

Mark Tamea is a rare species who is at the curious cross road of modern composition, electronic music and plunderphonics. For starters: I don't have an exact clue about what he really does - is that him actually playing something on this album, for example the string instruments which we sometimes encounter?

What he set out on his previous releases he explores again here. Six pieces on this album, and everything I knew about him returns. The modern classical approach in ‘Oikony Noyod’, microtonal synthesis in ‘The Lake’, and the elements of plunderphonics... they might be everywhere, hidden in every track.

The radiophonic aspect of his work is again never far away, and it evokes perhaps rather abstractly at things – although a title such as ‘Objet Trouve’ is something to think about – maybe he found some classical music? Tamea splices his music in a digital way, but puts it back together in a new form, very tonal at times, but also very abstract.

As with his previous release, ‘Metonymy’, I can’t say I am as surprised as I was with ‘Tessellation’, but that doesn’t mean I am not impressed. I think ‘Atomism’ harks back to ‘Tessellation’ more than to ‘Metonymy’, in the way that it uses a lot of acoustic instruments as well as some fine electronic charges. Great (traditional!) musique concrete. Excellent release, all around.

- Vital Weekly 886 

Metonymy

The kaleidoscopic compositional style and deft use of silence and suspension are in full force, the music pulling the listener along on a slowly evolving journey. Instrumentation is wide and varied, from found sounds and static drones, to plucked strings, percussion and bells. For fans of Mark's earlier work, 'Metonymy' is a tour de force.

- åpne sinn

Tessellation

Another reviewer has beaten me to the line in declaring this album as Modern Classical, and I would agree wholeheartedly with that assertion. It would play in any art space and would support performance. There is the air and space, the drama and the fluidity that translate to human movement. I feel there is a career for Tamea in this segment of the world of music.

The call and response of the sonic elements defines the maturity of this work. While there is no rhythm in the literal four on the floor sense, there is a pulse that transports the dialogue from beginning to end.

This album achieves a rare success - it is interesting and it is challenging. It has the mystery of the Mona Lisa smile. It moulds itself around the mood of the listener transporting that experience to a more vivid place. A catalyst of the soul. The snippets of classical instrumentation are pinpricks of light glimpsed through a felt curtain. The Rothko analogy is there waiting for the listener to recognise.

Also evident is the Tessallation metaphor, subtle and cliché-free. The work is a geometric patchwork of sonic components, each in balance with it's neighbour. There is a sonic tension that has the senses primed in expectation. Music is a contract of rules and conventions. And in any work of semi-abstraction, the listener's reception is primed to receive the information bound by those rules. Here, the rules are obeyed, but pushed up to the limit, challenging the listener to fill in the gaps and make something, the sum of the parts greater than the whole, a gestalt, in the same way detailed scrutiny of a painting by DeKooning pulls shapes out of a tangle of brush-stoke expressions. That is what I like about this work; it's success, an expression of poise and balance.

The artwork, an ambiguous photograph that splashes light against a dark background in the Old Testament apocalyptic manner supports the music appositely, marking a stage in the path from hand to eye to ear that is the act of playing the music.

- Alan Walker 

Buried Tractora

Mark Tamea’s Buried Traktora is something different again.

An unknown quantity to this listener, the studious net-naut can easily turn up salient Tameana, such as that “his recent output exploits atmosphere and juxtaposition to investigate what he imagines are the hidden parallels between the discernible and the esoteric...”. Liner notes reveal that Buried Traktora is “a composition inspired by the notion that matter is a conduit enabling consciousness to travel through time”. The (homepage) trailing of refs to Beuys, Duchamp and Rothko, all artists who challenged boundaries in their time, sends out further pre-listening signals that Tamea is likely to be a tricky conceptual customer.

In fact, from the off “Switched” is upon you with a bristling panorama of sounding objects creating a sonic tableau that would fall under the banner of ‘sound design’, containing few of the elements (melody, harmony, pitched material, rhythm) your folks know as the sound of ‘music’. On “Behold Orderly Digits”, however, things do tend to cohere into a more recogisably musical entity, albeit a queasy mood music of eerie ambiance populated by fleeting digi-effluvia and rattling ghost percussion. On “Odium” buffer override pile-ups and found sounds are slapped together into sound collage. Elsewhere there are incursions of instrument samples, while in other pieces electro-acoustics hold sway.

Overall, Tamea creates some atmospherically charged compositions, which crawl with queasy dream depictions. You might think of something like John Wall and his assembages of fragments and juxtaposed importations. Then think again. A challenging listen, and your meaning-making mileage may vary across its audio-drama scenes. Buried Traktora is, though, likely to mystify the bulk of the AW demographic for all that it signals their new spirit of adventure. Unsettling.

- Alan Lockett, e/i Magazine 

We simply don't have enough data.

mark@marktamea.com

(+31) 6 1498 9990

Nijmegen, The Netherlands